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Blog tour Unnoticed by Amanda Deed

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5 - 9 June 2017

Australian Christian Readers Blog Alliance

is Introducing


Unnoticed

(By Rhiza Press, 1 March, 2017)

ACRBA Tour Unnoticed by Amanda Deed

About the Book:
Plain Jane O’Reilly is good at being unnoticed. Detested by her stepmother and teased by her stepsisters, Jane has learned the art of avoiding attention. That is until Price Moreland, an American with big dreams, arrives in her small town.

Does she dare to hope someone might notice her?

However, Price Moreland may not be the prince that the whole town thinks him to be. Was his desire to be a missionary a God-given call, or just a good excuse to run from his past?

Complete with an evil stepmother, a missing shoe and a grand ball, Unnoticed takes the time-old Cinderella fairy tale and gives it an Australian twist.


About the Author:
Amanda Deed has penned several Australian Historical Romances, including The Game, winner of the CALEB Prize for Fiction in 2010. She resides in the South Eastern Suburbs of Melbourne with her family, where she works full-time in her local church office.
Outside of work and family, Amanda loves to write stories filled with intrigue and adventure using her favourite themes as a backdrop: Australia, heritage, romance and faith. Her books include Unnoticed, Ellenvale Gold, Black Forest Redemption and Henry's Run. For more information, go to www.amandadeed.com.au.

My review
This is a sweet retelling of the Cinderella story set in 1877 Australia and with Christian overtones. As one who is not normally into stories that retell fairy tales, I found this an enjoyable read. I liked Jane and Price, the two main characters, even though at times I found their decisions a little mystifying. The scenes set in the dentist’s chair made me glad for progress made by modern day dentistry. The stepsisters and stepmothers are suitably nasty and uncaring but it was Jane’s father that I found myself getting most annoyed with.
I liked the way the old story is woven into a new setting and the way the story evolves.

Needless to say, just as in the original story not all runs smoothly or according to plan. I also found it a little hard to comprehend that people could not see past Jane’s clothes since she was, according to Price, her father and Aunt Ruby, beautiful. But then it is a fairy tale, so sometimes you just have to go along with the story and not get caught up in all the details. The majority of the story works extremely well and it is a lot of fun. The Christian message comes through clearly and romance is always on the agenda. Setting and characters are well drawn. An enjoyable read, I did think it was a shame that the letters scattered through the story were written in such feint type. That might make it harder for some older people to read. But as it is probably intended for a younger audience, I guess this shouldn’t present too much of a problem. As usual a lovely cover on this charming Rhiza Press book.



































About the Book:



Plain Jane O’Reilly is good at being unnoticed. Detested by her stepmother and teased by her stepsisters, Jane has learned the art of avoiding attention. That is until Price Moreland, an American with big dreams, arrives in her small town.

Does she dare to hope someone might notice her?

However, Price Moreland may not be the prince that the whole town thinks him to be. Was his desire to be a missionary a God-given call, or just a good excuse to run from his past?

Complete with an evil stepmother, a missing shoe and a grand ball, Unnoticed takes the time-old Cinderella fairy tale and gives it an Australian twist.












About the Author:




Amanda Deed has penned several Australian Historical Romances, including The Game, winner of the CALEB Prize for Fiction in 2010. She resides in the South Eastern Suburbs of Melbourne with her family, where she works full-time in her local church office.



Outside of work and family, Amanda loves to write stories filled with intrigue and adventure using her favourite themes as a backdrop: Australia, heritage, romance and faith. Her books include Unnoticed, Ellenvale Gold, Black Forest Redemption and Henry's Run. For more information, go to www.amandadeed.com.au.
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Beyond the Fight - review and blog tour







3 - 7 October 2016






is Introducing







( Rhiza Press, 1 April 2016)







By Carol Preston

















About the Book:




Percy Smith has always wondered why he didn’t identify with his father, but he never expected the revelation about his past that comes at the beginning of the First World War. In shock and pain he finds himself in a place far from home, where he meets Mabel Smart, a young woman who is also struggling to find her own identity in her family.


Both Percy and Mabel must confront the issues raised by the war; internment of German born Australians, the push for conscription, the rush of young men to fight on the battlefields of Europe, and divisions in the Australian population over enlistment.


Ultimately Percy and Mabel’s search will be about finding a way to be at peace with their families.














About the Author:


Carol lives with her husband, Neil, in Wollongong, New South Wales. After their two children, Tammy and Adam, started school, Carol returned to study and completed a PhD at Wollongong University in 1986.


She is now a Psychologist in private practice. Carol enjoys gardening, bushwalking, spending time with her family and researching her family history. Her novels are based on her Australian ancestory. Carol's books in her Turning the Tide series published by Even Before Publishing include Mary's Guardian, Charlotte's Angel, Tangled Secrets and Truly Free.


Carol is also the author of Suzannah's Gold and Rebecca's Dream. Her first book with Rhiza Press is Next of Kin.


For more information about Carol's books and her other interests she can be contacted on her website: www.carolpreston.com.au







my review
Mabel Smart, has a mother who not only fusses over her, especially regarding her asthma, but also tries to control her life and who she will marry. Mabel has other ideas about the way she wants her life to go. She feels much closer to her Aunt Sarah. The time is around that of the First World War and times are changing for women. There is pressure from certain aspects of society for young men to enlist and rush off to war and talk of conscription. Percy Smith has no intention of enlisting. But he could be in trouble from another source, as Australia seeks the internment of Australians descended from those born in Germany.
It was interesting, though sad in many ways, to read this part of our history and the way people who had been here for many years were treated. Also sad to see the way those committed to the cause of war turned on those who did not hold such views. In the midst of this turmoil is a romance, between two people from different backgrounds.

It took me a little bit to get into this story but then I quickly became involved. Having read some other historical novels by Carol Preston and especially Next of Kin, it was good to catch up with some of those characters again. This was a thoroughly enjoyable novel and I learned a bit about our history and a couple of things I didn’t know about at the same time. A recommended read that should appeal to those who like historical novels and interesting books about Australia.
dale

Ehvah After blog tour

About the Book:

Ehvah Rowe’s life is in freefall. Her teen queen status is long forgotten, and with a childhood of tragic loss, no family save a diabolical aunt, and no career prospects, her

L.A. celebrity world holds no future.
It will take a murder, an escape to the Australian tropics, and the friendship of an Aussie bodyguard, for her to discover healing, faith, and a way forward.

David Blake knows how to be a soldier. His army training equipped him to fight and protect. But when it comes to helping a fear-filled celebrity navigate the same post-traumatic stress symptoms he has suffered, David discovers the challenge in forsaking his own strength for God’s plan.

Rose Dee weaves a story of mystery, drama and romance, in her trademark tropical North Queensland Australian style.
About the Author:

Rose Dee was born in Ingham, North Queensland, Australia. Her childhood experiences growing up in a small beach community would later provide inspiration for her first novel. Rose, who holds a Bachelor of Arts Degree, decided to try her hand at writing two years ago. The result of that attempt is her first novel, Back to Resolution. Her novels are inspired by the love of her coastal home and desire to produce exciting and contemporary stories of faith for women. Rose's other releases include Beyond Resolution - the second book in the 'Resolution' series. And A New Resolution the final book in the series. Rose has also co-written a novel in conjunction with three other outstanding Australian Authors: The Greenfield Legacy. Rose resides in Mackay, North Queensland with her husband, young son, and mischievous pup, Noodle.

My review

Ehvah has followed in the footsteps of her musician parents, choosing music as a career. But at 22 she is no longer a teen star and has become disappointed with the world she inhabits and the Los Angeles party scene. When she witnesses the murder of James, her aunt’s husband, she fears for her life. She ends up fleeing to Australia where her aunt is making a movie.
The death of James and the secret about the hidden money that it appears Ehvah doesn't realise she knows about, presents an interesting aspect to the story. Ehvah’s aunt Mara is a whiney and nasty piece of work, but she is the only family Ehvah has. Their relationship is rocky at best and with good reason. While in Australia Ehvah meets the enigmatic David, an ex-soldier who becomes her bodyguard. But can he keep her safe or will danger and trouble find her? The setting of Northern Queensland and some of its peculiar inhabitants is well described.

Ehvah was a likable character though I think younger women will probably relate to her better than I did. However like Ehvah, I had my share of problems with Bernie the carpet snake, the huntsman spiders and leeches. David, has a strong faith which has been nurtured by those close to him as they helped him through his experiences of post-traumatic stress. It seems at first David and Ehvah have little in common. Or maybe there is more than they thought?

This is an enjoyable read that kept my attention and I liked the strong faith displayed by David. There is a strong emphasis on God and His power to change lives. This adds a richer element to a story that is both a mystery and a romance. Thanks to the author who provided me with a free copy of this book as part of a blog tour for ACRBA (Australian Christian Reader s Blog Alliance).
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The Warrior Lord's Sword - blog tour


4 - 8 July
Australian Christian Readers Blog Alliance
is introducing
The Warrior Lord's Sword
(April 2016)
by Ray Hawkins

About the Book:
'The word of God is living and active, sharper than any two-edged sword ...'That is one of the ways the Bible defines itself. This Devotional takes you into 30 other of its definitions. Your confidence in and appreciation of God's word will be strengthened as you understand its claims.The author's hope is that this book will enrich your love for and understanding of God's unchanging scriptures. For God has expressed Himself within them so you will know Him in a personal way.Scripture is God's breath in print with power to declare His glory. It is His sword to strike against ungodliness. He has given it to us also to guide, guard and govern our relationship of faith in Him.

About the Author
Ray Hawkins, retired after over 40 years as a Churches of Christ minister, enjoys sharing themes from the Scriptures through Devotional writing. Married to Mary, multi-published inspirational romance author, they have three children and five grandchildren. Ray shares his insights in his first two books on Marriage and Children with more ideas to come about ministry and much more. Living in Beauty Point Tasmania Ray heads up a new Christian Fellowship as well as doing relief preaching, community work and writing.

My review

I’ve read and enjoyed several devotional books by Ray Hawkins. This was no exception. I particularly liked this one which focuses on The Bible – the Word of God. I liked the way it was set up too with a Sword Drill, which is a relevant bible verse at the end of each day’s devotional. Ray gives a lot of practical advice and insight from his study of God’s Word and his years in the ministry. Sometimes sentences just jumped out at me. ‘Decisions are easy to make and therefore easy to forsake.’ Any of us who have ever made a new year’s resolution only to have it fall by the wayside a short time later, could attest to that. In this case, Ray is taking about decisions made for Christ and stresses that it is far more than just making a decision. It is about following and making daily choices or continuing in what you have learned. To do this ‘demands effort of the will.’

A thought provoking idea on age 16 is “Christians are similar to roadside advertising signs’ meant to catch people’s attention. And then direct them to Jesus and the gospel. I could have taken excerpts from a lot of the pages but will give just a few others that struck me. Over many years there have been those who have sought to get rid of the bible but as we find here, ‘Whatever forces want to attack, undermine or smash the Scriptures will not succeed…. Scripture cannot be annulled, broken, melted down or dissolved. Therefore what it has said must be fulfilled.’

There is an interesting comment about the importance of the book of Jude and the religious charlatans it warns against. I also liked the way Ray picked up on Frodo’s journey in Lord of the Rings and likens it to God’s call and the Christian’s journey. The two days devoted to the familiar story of the Sower and the four soils for the seeds I found really well done. An excellent book to see the reader through 31 days, giving something to think about and act upon each day. I highly recommend this book.
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Shoes off, Feet up blog tour

ACRBA Tour Shoes Of Feet Up by Ellen Carr


6 - 10 June


Australian Christian Readers Blog Alliance

is introducing

Shoes Off Feet Up
(By HopePost Publishing, 25 November 2015)

by Ellen Carr



About the Book:


Shoes Off, Feet Up: Poems of everyday life and faith invites you to sit down, put your feet up and read awhile. It celebrates life with all its fun and adventures, its blessings and encouragements and its challenges. Some of Ellen's poems touch on the light-hearted and humorous side of life, some rejoice in the joys of life and nature, while others deal with the deeper issues of living with faith in God.

You are invited to dip into this book and find some treasures. You will be blessed, encouraged and amused by these poems, and occasionally you will be challenged. Shoes Off, Feet Up ~ poems you will want to return to again and again.

Ellen Carr is an award winning author who lives in Melbourne, Australia. She writes about life, nature, things of amusement, and of her faith in God. She enjoys seeing the funny side of life, as well as pondering things of more serious importance.

About the Author


Ellen Carr lives in Melbourne, Australia, with her husband,Rod. She has two adult daughters, Sarah and Alison, who have flown the nest. When she isn’t busy writing, Ellen delights in pottering about, drinking coffee, singing in a community choir, volunteering as a Christian religious studies teacher, travelling, and spending time with family and friends. A retired teacher, Ellen has always enjoyed writing. She has written educational material, radio scripts, short stories, and of course, poetry. Writing from her heart, her works are about life, nature, amusing situations, and her faith in God. Her faith and her daily walk with God are high priorities in her life, followed by
family, friends and fun. She enjoys seeing the funny side of life as well as pondering things of more serious importance.

Many of her award-winning poems and stories have been published at FaithWriters.com, an online Christian writers’ website, and some poems appear in Glimpses of Light, an Australian anthology, which raised money for CBM (formally Christian Blind Mission).

Several of her pieces will appear in the upcoming series, Mixed Blessings. Her poem, Twelve Long Years, included in this collection, was awarded a Judges’ Commendation in the Tabor Adelaide
Creative Writing Awards competition.

In addition, her poems have been read on the radio program, Songs of Hope, on 88.3 Southern FM, in Melbourne, Australia. She also wrote the lyrics for a song, The Peace of God, played on that same station. Other poems have appeared in church news sheets, religious educational material, magazines, and on Ellen’s blog.
You can find more of her work, and a link to her blog, at her website: Ellen Carr, Postbox Poetry and HopePost Publishing, at: postboxpoetry.wordpress.com

my review
This is a gentle, unassuming collection of poems and prayers many of them centred around the wonders of God’s creation or on social injustices. A number of them take as their starting point a biblical passage and then seek to bring them to life in poems. I particularly liked Twelve Long years, which was awarded a judge’s commendation in the Tabor Creative Writing Awards competition. I also liked Ruffle My Thoughts, You See the Cracks and Fear which do not rely heavily on rhyme as most of the poems do. Other poems display a nice touch of humour.
An expression I liked was ‘wash-rippled sand- which comes from the poem, Remembering, Never Forgetting and I really appreciated the thoughts expressed in Let’s Make Pearls. This is an easy to read collection of poems that can be dipped into from time to time. The index at the back is helpful in pointing the reader to poems on various topics.
Thanks to the author for my copy to read and review.
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Glimpses of Light

ACRBA Tour Glimpses of Light




2 - 6 May

Australian Christian Readers Blog Alliance

is introducing


Glimpses of Light
(By the Light Books, 15 December 2015)

Edited by Jeanette O'Hagan and Nola L Passmore

About the Book:
Be challenged, captivated and moved by these imaginative reflections on faith, help in time of need, joy in the midst of tragedy, and surprising encounters with God.

During 2015, the International Year of Light, twenty-one authors from Australia and the United States have come together to explore the theme of 'glimpses of light'—finding light in dark places—through short stories, poems, flash fiction and creative non-fiction.

Glimpses of Light includes contributions from respected and award-winning authors and poets Jo-Anne Berthelsen, Paula Vince, Lynne Stringer, Adele Jones, Jo Wanmer, Jeanette Grant-Thomson and Ellen Carr, as well as exciting new talent.

Profits from this anthology go to CBM Australia, giving sight to the blind.

About the Authors
JEANETTE O'HAGAN

Jeanette O’Hagan enjoys writing fiction, poetry, blogging and editing. She is writing her Akrad’s Legacy Series—a Young Adult secondary world fantasy fiction with adventure, courtly intrigue and romantic elements. Her short stories and poems are published in Tied in Pink romance anthology, Another Time Another Place, Poetica Christi’s Inner Child, Let the Sea Roar, Like a Girl.

Jeanette has practised medicine, studied communication, history, theology and, more recently, a Master’s in writing. She loves reading, painting, travel, catching up for coffee with friends, pondering the meaning of life and communicating God’s great love. She lives in Brisbane with her husband and children.

Website: jeanetteohagan.com

NOLA PASSMORE

Nola Passmore’s poetry, devotions, inspirational articles, and short fiction have appeared in magazines, journals and anthologies in Australia and overseas. Although she’s a former academic with qualifications in creative writing, psychology, and Christian ministry; she’s found that you can never underestimate the power of friends and mentors in the writing journey.

With ringleader roles in Quirky Quills and the Toowoomba chapter of Omega Writers, she’ll be nagging (oops, encouraging) other writers for some time. She and her husband Tim have a freelance writing and editing business called The Write Flourish.

Website: www.thewriteflourish.com.au


my review
From the stunning cover this book is a great and varied collection of stories, poems, prayers and non-fiction from real life experience. There are fantasy and science fiction stories, one told from the point of view of a horse and heartfelt poems. This book contains stories to inspire and to entertain. One story gives to those of us who are readers, an unthinkable picture of a people who were unable to read. They had been told, ‘it was evil to read.’ Who would tell them that? ‘People who didn’t want the truth to be known,’ comes the answer.

Thanks to the editors, I received a copy of this book free of charge as part of blog tour.
Not being one who usually reads short stories, rather than read this book cover to cover as I would a novel, I dipped into it from time to time. A story here, a poem or two there. Written by 21 Christian writers this book is a joy to read and should delight many readers with its variety of topics and approaches all written around the theme glimpses of light. Some of the authors were familiar to me. Other names were not but the standard of contributions to this anthology was consistently good. I found it hard to pick a favourite. However I did think the end piece which includes words and a story about one of my favourites hymns seemed a fitting place to finish. That hymn echoed in my head as I typed this review.
dale

Twice stolen blog tour and review








4 - 8 April



is introducing




(Armour Books, 14 February 2016)




Susanne Timpani

















About the Book:




After the death of his grandmother, Dimitri finds he's been lied to most of his life. His journey into the Outback to unravel the mystery of his identity leads to an encounter with Leah, a nurse with a tragic secret.













About the Author


Susanne is married, has four beautiful children and works as a community nurse with children and families. Themes of her work and her faith appear in her writing.



Susanne is the author of the blog, 10 Minute Daily Retreat. These twice weekly reflections on scripture can be read via:



http://susannetimpani.blogspot.com.au/

https://www.facebook.com/10MinuteDailyRetreat



Her first novel, Twice Stolen, was released in February 2016. It fits the genre of Inspirational Fiction, has Australian Aboriginal themes and is flavoured with a sprinkling of Medical Romance.








Twice stolen won the CALEB prize for an unpublished manuscript. The book is published by Armour Books











My review

This is an extremely interesting read. Twice stolen was the winner of the Caleb award for faith-inspired writing. It is easy to see why. There has been a lot of research has gone into the story, the characters are interesting and there is a wealth of information about Indigenous customs that threads its way through the story. I loved the characters of Dimitri, Leah and Aunty Paula and Lucy who feature predominately. The story is told from two perspectives, that of Dimitri and Leah. Like all of us, they sometimes get it wrong and make assumptions about others and about situations that are not always correct.
This is primarily a book about people and the secrets they keep and the situations they find themselves in. In the course of this story the reader learns more about the Stolen Generation, a sad fact of Australia’s past. It is a novel to stir the emotions with compassion, anger, sorrow and I’d be surprised if readers manage to get through it without a few teary eyes. But is also a book about love, forgiveness and hope. Packed with lots of interesting information and insights, I thoroughly enjoyed it and loved the descriptions of the outback and its people.
Lovely to see a new voice in the realm of Australian fiction. The novel is set off by a beautiful cover. This book will be launched in Adelaide on February 14. I was privileged to have my copy given to me from the publisher to read and review. An absorbing read, this is a bright start for Armour books, a new publisher on the Australian scene.
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Learning about New Zealand among other things




7 - 11 March



is introducing


(Rhiza Press, 1 October 2015)



About the Book:

Since she watched her village burn to the ground, Mere’s life has been anything but dull. Now as an older woman she has come to stay with Helene and James to finish writing her life story – a tale of injustice, revenge and
reconciliation.

But Helene and James have their own problems. After five years together, their marriage has become dull, predictable, boring … and it starts to unravel.

Weaving fiction with the traumatic history of the Ngati Whatua tribe of Auckland, The Pounamu Prophecy sweeps from the sultry heat of Australia to the verdant shores of New Zealand.


About the Author


Cindy Williams lives in Sydney with her husband and teenage son.

As a child growing up in a culturally rich part of New Zealand she enjoyed writing, not copious screeds, but short intense pieces that brought tears to her eyes and made people think. She marvelled at the power of words to inspire far beyond the intentions of the author.

Then she became a dietitian – all science and seriously researched facts. She completed a Master of Public Health and a Graduate Diploma in Communication and spent many years encouraging and inspiring people to live a healthy life.

She writes a nutrition blog – www.nutritionchic.com – and is working on her second novel, set in first century Israel. She teaches scripture in schools, and swim and cycles. She is also studying for a Diploma of Theology and trying to improve her abysmal French!


my review

Despite the fact that New Zealand is our near neighbour I admit to knowing nothing, before I read this book, about the Bastion Point protests. So that was a learning experience for me. I liked reading Mere’s story which starts back In Okahu Bay, Auckland in 1951. I found much of the time I was more interested in Mere and her New Zealand story that I was in the modern day story of James and Helene. I found them largely aggravating with their outlook of life and how little their marriage meant to them that they could contemplate endangering it so easily. That I wanted to knock their heads together and tell them to ‘wake up’ to themselves, shows that they came across as believable and indicative of some people in today’s world.

The story gathered momentum after the lives of James and Helene interact more with Mere, after she comes to stay in the guest house on their property. Mere is lovely and it is very easy to warm to her. She is full of hard won wisdom. So is her friend Liz who says about the past and her father’s attitude to the hurt done to their family, ’I eventually realised Dad’s way was right. If I held onto my anger it would paralyse my life. He always said that we can’t control what happens but we can control how we react to it.’ They sound like wise words to me.

I was given this book free of charge by the publishers in return for an honest review. This is a book that shows how the past and dreams can shape lives, but that ultimately each of us has a choice about what is important to us and how we deal with those. It evoked anger in me and tears at times. But overall I enjoyed reading this book, learning more about New Zealand history, the Maori people and their customs and how one or two people can impact many lives.
dale

Winner chosen

Thanks to all who entered my giveaway. The winner of a copy of has been chosen by Goodreads.
Congratulations to Kerry Green. The book will be winging its way over to Western Australia tomorrow.
Meanwhile anyone interested can read a few poems on the poetry pages of my website http://www.daleharcombe.com. If you want to purchase a copy of Kaleidoscope you can also do that on the books page of my website. http://www.daleharcombe.com
dale

Next of Kin - blog tour and book review




7 - 11 February



is introducing


Next of Kin

(Rhiza Press, May 2015)


Carol Preston



About the Book:

Fanny Franks was raised to believe in honesty, equality and acceptance, regardless of background or circumstances. When she meets brothers Jack and Jim, she is drawm to them by the alienation and injustice which seems to pervade their lives. She is determined to intervene and help them find happiness, until a trauma in her own life brings discrimination and shame for which she is ill prepared. While she deals with her own struggle she comes to understand what Jim and Jack are going through - and they find where they truly belong.


About the Author

Carol lives in Wollongong with her husband, Neil. She is a psychologist and has a part time private counselling practice, as well as being an author and speaker. Carol enjoys spending time with her children and four grandchildren, as well as bushwalking, gardening and holidaying overseas with her husband. One of her hobbies over many years has been family history research.

It was this research which started Carol on the journey of writing novels. Her first trilogy is about the Oakes Family; Suzannah’s Gold, Rebecca’s Dream and The Price of Peace, which takes the reader from 1838 when her great great grandmother, Suzannah Casey was transported from Ireland, through to the end of the First World War. Carol’s fourth novel, The Face of Forgiveness, is about two young women who are transported to Australia in 1839.

Carol has also written the Turning the Tide Series, based on her mother’s family, which begins with the First Fleet of convicts to Australia in 1788. These include Mary’s Guardian, Charlotte’s Angel, Tangled Secrets, and Truly Free. Next of Kin is her ninth novel. For more information about Carol’s books and her other interests she can be contacted on her website: www.carolpreston.com.au, on her Facebook author page: www.facebook.com/writingtoreach
or her Amazon author page: www.amazon.com/author/carolpreston


My review

This is an interesting, Australian historical read. It took me a little while to get into it but then the further into this story I moved, the more I enjoyed it. It tells the story of Fanny Franks who is accepting of others regardless of where they are from. She works for Hans and Marlena Giese. It is at their European Hotel where she meets their nephews, Jim and Jack. Jim and Jack, after a troubled childhood thanks to their mother’s second marriage, have virtually cut off all dealing with their mother. This is a book about relationships and the things that can affect them either directly or indirectly. It also deals with issues like forgiveness, the differences between cultures and prejudice both racial and religious.

I really liked the strong, determined and, at times, outspoken character of Fanny, although I struggled from beginning to end with the name. Somehow to me it just didn’t suit the character. But that could be because I have an aversion to the name. Marlena Giese is a lovely warm character and I liked the contrast in personality, behaviour and approach of the two nephews. There is a violent incident in the story, but it is not graphically described. I found this an enjoyable read that gives good glimpses into Australia’s landscape, attitudes, history and heritage.